Help, I'm Alive!
Hello, this is my blog of miscalleny, bits and bobs and various sundry. Its basically a collage or things stuff that I find interesting, funny, sad, or inane. it's kind of a mixed bag of everything, from happy to sad, if you like video games, art, music, comics, TV and movies, (and maybe with some girls and fashion thrown in there) you could do worse than follow me. I have a creative blog at alexisxerox.tumblr.com where i post short stories, photography, drawings and short films that I've done. (there's also a link to my short story site below)

thank you for reading.
Help, I'm Alive!
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tokyoghosts:

Sunny day by masahiro_ami on Flickr.
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I’m a star. I’m a star I’m a star I’m a star.

I’m a star. I’m a star I’m a star I’m a star.

I’m a star. I’m a star I’m a star I’m a star.

I’m a star. I’m a star I’m a star I’m a star.

I’m a star. I’m a star I’m a star I’m a star.

I’m a star. I’m a star I’m a star I’m a star.

I’m a star. I’m a star I’m a star I’m a star.

I’m a star. I’m a star I’m a star I’m a star.
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hitsvilleuk:

As “rock historians” will tell you, 1994 was a turning point in American rock music. With Kurt Cobain’s passing, grunge began to wane, and the public seemed to embrace the lighter side of life again. Of course, you shouldn’t listen to rock historians – it’s not even a real job – but there is a lot of evidence for this. Green Day won the country’s hearts with regaling tales of apathy and masturbation. Meanwhile, The Offspring released Smash, and while the single that got everyone’s attention, "Self Esteem", wasn’t all sunshine, lollipops and rainbows, it was a far cry from “I Hate Myself And I Want To Die”.
Another big rock album of the year was released by an LA rock band called Weezer. They formed two years prior to the release of this album, and were playing the likes of "Say It Ain’t So" and "Undone – The Sweater Song" in rock clubs to crowds of approximately no one. One day, an A&R representative from Geffen decided the band needed to be signed. At first, the label must have been apprehensive. “These people don’t look like a rock band. They look like nerds! And nerds won’t be fashionable for another *looks at watch* twenty years or so! How are we gunna market a buncha nerds who play freaking guitar solos! This is the ’90s, man! Find me another cool band who play them grunge riffs, like Pear Jam or Songgarden!”.
Eventually, they agreed to let the young geeks have a crack at recording a big rock album. In a move that must have struck fear in a label looking for an alternative album that would sell, the band began practising as a barber shop quartet to perfect their harmonies. Given the trend for vocalists delivering barely comprehensible yowls at the time, this was way more of a risk than it sounds, but it became pivotal to bands approach to the album.
What they ended up producing was an uncharacteristically uncool ’90s alternative album, but one that was completely necessary. Nirvana were a great band, but not everyone could write simple, stomping rock songs with the same power as Kurt Cobain did. The scruffy looks, the gloomy lyrics and the disregard for ability had become cliché by the time Weezer got around to releasing their eponymous debut album (now universally known as The Blue Album), and it must have been wearing thin with certain listeners.
Weezer brought back the guitar solo with aplomb. It seemed as if their contemporaries at the guitar had considered guitar solos to be masturbatory, but Rivers reminded the world that you didn’t have to want to be Van Halen or Slash to write something memorable. The solo that opens "Holiday", for example, bares a weirdly close resemblance to the solo from The Darkness’ Christmas single. But whereas “Christmas Time (Don’t Let The Bells End)” is now buried deep in your CD collection where no one can see it, “Holiday” sounds timeless, tasteful and fitting. Weezer found a way to shoehorn solos that sounded like they could have been on a Thin Lizzy album into power-pop and alternative rock songs in a way that didn’t sound ridiculous. Thank god they did, to, because this bold move undoubtedly inspired countless guitarists to practice their scales instead of being content with knowing how to play powerchords.
Then there were the lyrics. Rivers was never the happiest of chaps, but Weezer brought a warm sense of nostalgia to even his most melancholy songs. Even “Say It Aint So”, a ballad about his parents’ divorce and his father’s alcoholism, referenced flipping on the telly to watch “Jimmy” wrestle. Meanwhile, Rivers gets positively wistful during "In The Garage", referencing everything from Kiss to The X-Men.
While on the subject of comics, Rivers were full of unashamedly nerdy references. This is nothing now, but it must have been a revelation in the mid-’90s to hear a band that proudly declared that they looked like "Buddy Holly" getting mainstream attention. Weezer were pioneers in wearing their nerdy interests with pride.
Speaking of “Buddy Holly”, that’s the song that you non-Weezer fanatics have heard of, isn’t it? It’s the one with the quirky little video that Spike Jonze cleverly made to look like they were performing in the diner from Happy Days. It’s undeniably an iconic video, and the song itself is pretty damn awesome too, with its nursery rhyme-like catchy chorus and its little flourishes of electronic organ. Well, anyway, Rivers fucking hated it. Okay, that might be a bit of an exaggeration – there are stories that indicate he had to be talked into recording it, and that the success of the video caused him to worry about being seen as “that band with that video”, causing him to record the noise-rock influenced Pinkerton a mere two years later.
Rivers comes across as a bit of an awkward personality; someone that was not, at the time, entirely suited for rock stardom. During the aftermath of the band’s sudden success, he seemed to become increasingly reclusive. He cut his hair to try and avoid the “geek” gimmick that had been thrust upon the band, and recording a whole album’s worth of material that he decided to scrap at the last minute. The album recorded in its wake was Pinkerton: a legendary album in its own right. However, it lacked the pure pop bliss that can be heard on The Blue Album.
Weezer, of course, are still knocking around. Every now and then they release an absolutely stomping single, like "Pork & Beans" or Back To The Shack, but the general consensus seems to be that they will never be able to bottle guitar-pop lightning like they did on Blue again. Somebody even went as far as to try and raise $10million on Kickstarter to get them to break-up, but that’s kind of a dick move in my eyes. I caught Weezer for the first time at Sonisphere 2011, and seeing the songs off of Blue performed in front of my eyes was an experience I would like to repeat again and again for the rest of my life. It’s a damn shame that they probably won’t repeat the success of it again, but when an album is this timeless, a band really doesn’t have anything to prove.
hitsvilleuk:

As “rock historians” will tell you, 1994 was a turning point in American rock music. With Kurt Cobain’s passing, grunge began to wane, and the public seemed to embrace the lighter side of life again. Of course, you shouldn’t listen to rock historians – it’s not even a real job – but there is a lot of evidence for this. Green Day won the country’s hearts with regaling tales of apathy and masturbation. Meanwhile, The Offspring released Smash, and while the single that got everyone’s attention, "Self Esteem", wasn’t all sunshine, lollipops and rainbows, it was a far cry from “I Hate Myself And I Want To Die”.
Another big rock album of the year was released by an LA rock band called Weezer. They formed two years prior to the release of this album, and were playing the likes of "Say It Ain’t So" and "Undone – The Sweater Song" in rock clubs to crowds of approximately no one. One day, an A&R representative from Geffen decided the band needed to be signed. At first, the label must have been apprehensive. “These people don’t look like a rock band. They look like nerds! And nerds won’t be fashionable for another *looks at watch* twenty years or so! How are we gunna market a buncha nerds who play freaking guitar solos! This is the ’90s, man! Find me another cool band who play them grunge riffs, like Pear Jam or Songgarden!”.
Eventually, they agreed to let the young geeks have a crack at recording a big rock album. In a move that must have struck fear in a label looking for an alternative album that would sell, the band began practising as a barber shop quartet to perfect their harmonies. Given the trend for vocalists delivering barely comprehensible yowls at the time, this was way more of a risk than it sounds, but it became pivotal to bands approach to the album.
What they ended up producing was an uncharacteristically uncool ’90s alternative album, but one that was completely necessary. Nirvana were a great band, but not everyone could write simple, stomping rock songs with the same power as Kurt Cobain did. The scruffy looks, the gloomy lyrics and the disregard for ability had become cliché by the time Weezer got around to releasing their eponymous debut album (now universally known as The Blue Album), and it must have been wearing thin with certain listeners.
Weezer brought back the guitar solo with aplomb. It seemed as if their contemporaries at the guitar had considered guitar solos to be masturbatory, but Rivers reminded the world that you didn’t have to want to be Van Halen or Slash to write something memorable. The solo that opens "Holiday", for example, bares a weirdly close resemblance to the solo from The Darkness’ Christmas single. But whereas “Christmas Time (Don’t Let The Bells End)” is now buried deep in your CD collection where no one can see it, “Holiday” sounds timeless, tasteful and fitting. Weezer found a way to shoehorn solos that sounded like they could have been on a Thin Lizzy album into power-pop and alternative rock songs in a way that didn’t sound ridiculous. Thank god they did, to, because this bold move undoubtedly inspired countless guitarists to practice their scales instead of being content with knowing how to play powerchords.
Then there were the lyrics. Rivers was never the happiest of chaps, but Weezer brought a warm sense of nostalgia to even his most melancholy songs. Even “Say It Aint So”, a ballad about his parents’ divorce and his father’s alcoholism, referenced flipping on the telly to watch “Jimmy” wrestle. Meanwhile, Rivers gets positively wistful during "In The Garage", referencing everything from Kiss to The X-Men.
While on the subject of comics, Rivers were full of unashamedly nerdy references. This is nothing now, but it must have been a revelation in the mid-’90s to hear a band that proudly declared that they looked like "Buddy Holly" getting mainstream attention. Weezer were pioneers in wearing their nerdy interests with pride.
Speaking of “Buddy Holly”, that’s the song that you non-Weezer fanatics have heard of, isn’t it? It’s the one with the quirky little video that Spike Jonze cleverly made to look like they were performing in the diner from Happy Days. It’s undeniably an iconic video, and the song itself is pretty damn awesome too, with its nursery rhyme-like catchy chorus and its little flourishes of electronic organ. Well, anyway, Rivers fucking hated it. Okay, that might be a bit of an exaggeration – there are stories that indicate he had to be talked into recording it, and that the success of the video caused him to worry about being seen as “that band with that video”, causing him to record the noise-rock influenced Pinkerton a mere two years later.
Rivers comes across as a bit of an awkward personality; someone that was not, at the time, entirely suited for rock stardom. During the aftermath of the band’s sudden success, he seemed to become increasingly reclusive. He cut his hair to try and avoid the “geek” gimmick that had been thrust upon the band, and recording a whole album’s worth of material that he decided to scrap at the last minute. The album recorded in its wake was Pinkerton: a legendary album in its own right. However, it lacked the pure pop bliss that can be heard on The Blue Album.
Weezer, of course, are still knocking around. Every now and then they release an absolutely stomping single, like "Pork & Beans" or Back To The Shack, but the general consensus seems to be that they will never be able to bottle guitar-pop lightning like they did on Blue again. Somebody even went as far as to try and raise $10million on Kickstarter to get them to break-up, but that’s kind of a dick move in my eyes. I caught Weezer for the first time at Sonisphere 2011, and seeing the songs off of Blue performed in front of my eyes was an experience I would like to repeat again and again for the rest of my life. It’s a damn shame that they probably won’t repeat the success of it again, but when an album is this timeless, a band really doesn’t have anything to prove.
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make me choose→ leos-oscars asked: Spike Jonze or Wes Anderson films

make me choose→ leos-oscars asked: Spike Jonze or Wes Anderson films

make me choose→ leos-oscars asked: Spike Jonze or Wes Anderson films

make me choose→ leos-oscars asked: Spike Jonze or Wes Anderson films

make me choose→ leos-oscars asked: Spike Jonze or Wes Anderson films

make me choose→ leos-oscars asked: Spike Jonze or Wes Anderson films

make me choose→ leos-oscars asked: Spike Jonze or Wes Anderson films

make me choose→ leos-oscars asked: Spike Jonze or Wes Anderson films
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hfgl:


OK, so we got a trooper pulls someone over, we got a shooting, these folks drive by, there’s a high-speed pursuit, ends here and then this execution-type deal.

This movie. This movie’s perfect imagery.
hfgl:


OK, so we got a trooper pulls someone over, we got a shooting, these folks drive by, there’s a high-speed pursuit, ends here and then this execution-type deal.

This movie. This movie’s perfect imagery.
hfgl:


OK, so we got a trooper pulls someone over, we got a shooting, these folks drive by, there’s a high-speed pursuit, ends here and then this execution-type deal.

This movie. This movie’s perfect imagery.
hfgl:


OK, so we got a trooper pulls someone over, we got a shooting, these folks drive by, there’s a high-speed pursuit, ends here and then this execution-type deal.

This movie. This movie’s perfect imagery.
hfgl:


OK, so we got a trooper pulls someone over, we got a shooting, these folks drive by, there’s a high-speed pursuit, ends here and then this execution-type deal.

This movie. This movie’s perfect imagery.
hfgl:


OK, so we got a trooper pulls someone over, we got a shooting, these folks drive by, there’s a high-speed pursuit, ends here and then this execution-type deal.

This movie. This movie’s perfect imagery.
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my-mother-dearest:

[x]
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englishsnow:

risa ikeda
englishsnow:

risa ikeda
englishsnow:

risa ikeda
englishsnow:

risa ikeda
englishsnow:

risa ikeda
englishsnow:

risa ikeda
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englishsnow:

 sophie_splean
englishsnow:

 sophie_splean
englishsnow:

 sophie_splean
englishsnow:

 sophie_splean
englishsnow:

 sophie_splean
englishsnow:

 sophie_splean
englishsnow:

 sophie_splean
englishsnow:

 sophie_splean
englishsnow:

 sophie_splean
Album Art
6,761 plays Source
Album Art
1,479 plays Source
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"I am on the floor every day with those kids. And last night, that girl sat next to me and she cried and she tried to tell me the only way that she knew how." - Short Term 12 (2013)

"I am on the floor every day with those kids. And last night, that girl sat next to me and she cried and she tried to tell me the only way that she knew how." - Short Term 12 (2013)

"I am on the floor every day with those kids. And last night, that girl sat next to me and she cried and she tried to tell me the only way that she knew how." - Short Term 12 (2013)

"I am on the floor every day with those kids. And last night, that girl sat next to me and she cried and she tried to tell me the only way that she knew how." - Short Term 12 (2013)
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Sometimes we don’t get to choose where our talents lie.

Sometimes we don’t get to choose where our talents lie.
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englishsnow:

by Ma Tiantian Ma
englishsnow:

by Ma Tiantian Ma
englishsnow:

by Ma Tiantian Ma
englishsnow:

by Ma Tiantian Ma
englishsnow:

by Ma Tiantian Ma
englishsnow:

by Ma Tiantian Ma
englishsnow:

by Ma Tiantian Ma
englishsnow:

by Ma Tiantian Ma
englishsnow:

by Ma Tiantian Ma
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baburujidai:

Shinjuku, 1983
baburujidai:

Shinjuku, 1983
baburujidai:

Shinjuku, 1983
baburujidai:

Shinjuku, 1983
baburujidai:

Shinjuku, 1983